FORMER HAWK GREAT EMERSON BOOZER TO BE INDUCTED INTO COLLEGE FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME
Emerson Boozer (left) will be enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame.
Emerson Boozer (left) will be enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame.

May 13, 2010

DALLAS - Former Hawk gridiron great Emerson Boozer is among four players and two coaches to be named to the 2010 Divisional Class of the College Football Hall of Fame, announced this past Tuesday by Archie Manning, chairman of the National Football Foundation & College Hall of Fame.

Boozer played for the University of Maryland Eastern Shore (UMES), then Maryland State College (MSC), from 1962-1965. Boozer, who wore the famed #44, a jersey worn by many great Hawk running backs, complied 2,537 yards and 22 touchdowns on 374 carries during his career. He averaged an impressive 6.78 yards per carry during his time in the Maroon and Grey. His career rushing yards total still stands as a UMES record.

His Hawks totaled an 18-9-1 record during his tenure. Over 28 games, Boozer averaged an amazing 90.61 yards per game.

A two-time CIAA All-American, Boozer was drafted in the sixth round, 46th overall, by the New York Jets in the AFL draft, playing for 10 seasons. He was also picked in the NFL draft that same year by the Steelers in the seventh round with the 98th pick, before the merger of the two leagues.

He was named the 1966 AFL Rookie of the Year by The Pittsburgh Courier, a two-time AFL All-Star in 1966 and 1968, winning the AFL Championship in the latter. That year, they defeated the Baltimore Colts in the Super Bowl, marking the first time an AFL team defeated an original NFL franchise. He was named an All-Conference selection by The Sporting News in 1967, leading the AFL in rushing touchdowns with 10 and total TDs with 13. In 1972 Boozer had 14 scores to lead the league.

He currently ranks 52nd all-time in rushing touchdowns (52) and 100th in total TDs (65). He finished with over 5,000 total rushing yards (5,135) and just shy of 1,500 receiving yards (1,488).

Boozer, a native of Augusta, Ga., graduated with a degree from MSC in Industrial Arts. He was inducted into the UMES Hall of Fame in 1982 and currently resides in Long Island, N.Y. with his wife, Enez Bowins, also a graduate of MSC. He worked at one time as an analyst for football games at CBS.

An alumni publication from 1998 said Boozer "had the heart of a lion, ran like a jaguar with the grace of a gazelle, but soared as a Hawk."

He is one of three Hawks now to be named to the College Football Hall of Fame. Roger Brown was inducted in 2009 and legendary coach Vernon "Skip" McCain was enshrined in 2006. All were nominated by the Hawks for Football alumni group.

Boozer, along with Troy Brown, a wide receiver for Marshall from 1991-92, join California Lutheran linebacker Brian Kelley and Massachusetts tight end Milt Morin as players, while Willie Jeffries and Ted Kessinger were elected as coaches.

"The 2010 Divisional Hall of Fame Class consists of players and coaches who have defined excellence in our sport," said Manning, a 1989 Hall of Fame inductee from Ole Miss. "We share the pride felt by their families, friends and schools and look forward to immortalizing their achievements in college football's ultimate shrine."

The 2010 Divisional Hall of Fame Class considers players and coaches from the NCAA Football Championship Subdivision (formerly I-AA), Divisions II, III, and the NAIA (National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics) for induction. This year's class will be inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame during the Enshrinement Festival, July 16-17, in South Bend, Ind.

2010 DIVISIONAL COLLEGE FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME CLASS
PLAYERS:
EMERSON BOOZER - Maryland Eastern Shore, HB (1962-65)
TROY BROWN - Marshall, WR (1991-92)
BRIAN KELLEY - California Lutheran, LB (1969- 72)
MILT MORIN - Massachusetts, TE (1963- 65)

COACHES:
WILLIE JEFFRIES* - 179-132-6 (.574); Howard (1984- 88), Wichita State (1979-83), South Carolina State (1973-78, 1989-2001)
TED KESSINGER - 219-57-1 (.792); Bethany (Kan.) (1976-2003)